Ambivalent Skeptic

May 10, 2012

Turkey loads, recoil, and the elephant gun

This is for the guys and geeks that like numbers and ballistics.

My earlier post mentioned how the recoil of a seven and a half pound gun did a number on my shoulder.

No wonder. Turkey loads of infamous for heavy recoil. But how heavy?

I subscribe to the recoil velocity school of thought as The AnarchAngel so well explains.

Sure there are people who say a .375 H&H with 40 ft-lbs of recoil energy (RE) kicks twice as hard as a 180 grain 30-06 load with 20 ft-lbs of RE. Or maybe they’ve just convinced themselves that the 16 fps recoil velocity from a 375 hurts twice as much as 12 fps of recoil velocity from the ’06. I don’t know.

Here are the numbers for the turkey loads in my gun:
A load of 1.75 oz shot at a nominal 1300 fps has 2872 ft-lbs of “muzzle” energy, a recoil energy (RE) of 53.2 ft-lbs and a recoil velocity of 21.2fps.

I also fired a few Federal Top Gun loads:
One and 1/8 oz of shot at a nominal 1145 fps has 1432 ft-lbs of muzzle energy, RE of 20.3 ft-lbs and a recoil velocity of 13.1 fps.

In contrast, a 30-06 in an 8 lb gun has:
A 150 gr bullet at 2910 fps for 2820 ft-lbs of muzzle energy, RE of 18.6 ft-lbs and a recoil velocity of 12.2 fps.

And a heavy 458 Win Mag load in a 9.5 lb gun is:
A 500 gr bullet at 2260 fps for 5669 ft-lbs of muzzle energy, RE of 68.3 ft-lbs and a recoil velocity of 21.5 fps.

So that turkey load from that light shotgun was close to equal recoil of an elephant gun. And that was excluding the wad weight. The shotgun recoil is actually higher. So if you can handle long range sessions with a shotgun and turkey loads, you should find a 458 Win Mag downright pleasant.

So is turkey hunting the North America equivalent to elephant hunting? Not really, but it’s still cool.

Links
http://anarchangel.blogspot.com/2006/12/push-and-kick.html

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May 9, 2012

Turkey loads will kick…

Filed under: hunting,Shooting — Clint1911 @ 8:01 am
Tags: , , ,

Well, for those who know me IRL, I’ve been busy like a one legged man in a butt-kicking contest. Finally have time for myself and for the blog.

There is no easy way to come back from a hiatus so let’s get to it.

It’s turkey hunting season in Ohio, and I finally had a chance to pattern my shotgun with turkey loads. 1.75 oz at a nominal 1300 FPS, in a gun that weights 7.63 lb with a sling, 7.29 lbs without the sling.

Not being used to bead sights, I had my head too high on the stock, once. The first shot whipped upward and slapped me hard; I felt it in my cheek!

The second shot was textbook, but after the third shot, I had a so-called “finch.” And I dry fired on the firing line until I was comfortable again.

All told, I fired four rounds of the stiff stuff and, frankly, at the time it was not so bad. But on the way home – my shoulder was protesting. I was surprised at how sore it became.

In hindsight, since my deltoid is what hurts the most, I say I was holding the gun wrong. Many people, Jeff Cooper being one, have commented on long guns having stocks too long. I’m over six foot with orangutang arms and I’m thinking the stock could benefit from being a 1/2 inch shorter. It’s worth checking out.

I hope to be in the woods Thursday, so I will be dry firing after I post this. I should dry fire twice more tomorrow. This way, if I get lucky like Phil Bourjaily, I can focus on the bird and not on what my body is doing. Contrary to popular belief, if your unconscious mind insists on bracing for recoil, you’re gonna “flinch.” Whether you notice recoil or not, it is still there but most importantly, your mind knows it will happen. You need to condition yourself to not fear the gun, so the fear isn’t lurking unexpectedly in the back of your mind.

I also fired a few Federal Top Gun loads, 1 and 1/8 oz at a nominal 1145 FPS.

About the recoil of a 30-06. But nothing like a turkey load.

Turkey loads will kick your arse.

links
http://www.fieldandstream.com/blogs/gun-nuts/2012/04/turkey-hunting-sleep-late-get-lucky

July 25, 2011

Hunting in PA:Sundays and consequences

Filed under: debate,hunting — Clint1911 @ 11:03 am

Pennsylvania currently bans hunting. Some want to change that. Yet many farmers, often the people who can benefit most from the ban ending want it to stay.

Snowflakes in Hell has more.
http://www.snowflakesinhell.com/2011/07/18/sunday-hunting-in-pa/

One problem is that many people do not understand consequences nor implications.

With a Sunday hunting ban, and because most people work Monday thru Friday, that compresses hunting to Saturday. So almost everyone who hunts, hunts on Saturday and the woods and fields are full and crowded.

What if you open up Sunday to hunting? Understand that the intuitive answer is different from the logical answer.

Intuitively, people see hunters making the most of non-work days to hunt, which is their passion. Intuitively, people assume that if Sunday was open to hunting it would be just like Saturday.
Just as full, just as crowded.

Logically, we get a different answer. The overall “hunting-days” will increase, but not double. That is because not everyone can spare two days a week to hunt. Only without a Sunday ban, said hunters can choose between one of two days.

However the hunting will increase. People who want to hunt but cannot do so on Saturday can now hunt on Sunday and, yes, some people will hunt on both weekend days

My beef is with the land-owners who say they will stop giving permission to hunt if Sunday hunting is allowed. This short-sightedness will only harm both parities. First the farmer as he will have more animals harming his crops; and second, the hunters who now need to crowd another area. Ironic considering that that Sunday hunting is primarily to relive crowded hunting conditions.

When you give permission you can give permission with limits. Giving permission is not always carte-blanche.

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